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15+ amazing pictures of the Lebanese ‘Mandaloun’

The term ‘Mandaloun’ is of unknown origin and does not derive from any Arabic verbal root.

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Some people believe it is from Italian origin and links to the Italian term ‘Mandolino’, a musical instrument of the flute family.

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The theory indicates that the Mandaloun’s disposition and location were favorable for the instrument’s player thus the naming. 

 

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In 1608 prince Fakhreddine II of Lebanon concluded a secret economic and military alliance with the Grand Duke of Tuscany against the Ottoman rulers.

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After the Ottoman found out about the prince’s move, he chose to seek exile in Italy from 1613 until 1618 before returning to Beirut.

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During those 5 years, Fakhreddine was exposed to Florentine architecture particularly the bifores which are double arcades windows known in Lebanon as “Mandaloun”.

 

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The mandaloun was built with local limestone and consists of a vertical, fine column forming a division between two units of a window.

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The traditional mandaloun is always surmounted by a discharging arch and is often coupled with hanging flower boxes.

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Mandalouns were usually located in a prominent part of houses and palaces.

 

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Even the Lebanese Parliament in Beirut displays Mandalouns as well as the Lebanese triple arcade.

 

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Lebanese architecture is really a melting pot of various influences. From Italian to Ottoman and Greek, Lebanese buildings are rich in beautiful elements and structures in harmony.

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These mesmerizing architectural facades should be preserved in order to save our national heritage.


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15+ amazing pictures of the Lebanese 'Mandaloun'

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