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Carlos Ghosn Just Shared New Details About His Life in Lebanon and His Escape

Carlos Ghosn Reveals New Details About His Escape, Life In Lebanon
EFE/EPA/WAEL HAMZEH

Former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn has shared new details about his infamous escape from Japan, his new life in Lebanon, and the upcoming visit of French investigators.

In a new AP interview, Ghosn expressed readiness for questioning by French investigative judges who are set to land in Lebanon next week, saying he was anxious to share his side of his face-off with the Japanese judiciary.

The judges will question the fugitive businessman on allegations of financial misconduct over the course of a week they will spend in Beirut.

Ghosn emphasized his defense of his former aide, Greg Kelly, who is now standing trial in Japan for allegedly helping the business magnate underreport his compensation.

During the interview, Ghosn also commented on father and son Michael and Peter Taylor, the Americans who are also facing trial in Japan on charges of helping Ghosn escape in 2019.

He described what happened to the Taylors and Kelly as “collateral damage” that was the result of what he maintains was an organized plot targeting him.

On the recent decision by a Dutch court ordering him to pay nearly $6 million, Ghosn said he plans to appeal the verdict, calling it “an upset.”

He also shared details about his daring escape from the grip of the Japanese authorities, including how he chose to make his move in December, during which he would be less likely to be recognized amid the heavy traffic into and out of Japan.

He wore a hat and heavy clothes to further reduce the chance of being detected. “It was very bold, but because it was bold, I thought it may be successful,” he said.

The notorious escape ultimately landed Ghosn in Lebanon, where he continues to reside today.

Himself a Lebanese citizen, Ghosn said in the interview that he feels safe and free in the country, which is facing its worst economic crisis yet.

The 67-year-old revealed that he spent 6 months repairing his home after it was damaged during the August 4 Beirut Port explosion.


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Carlos Ghosn Just Shared New Details About His Life in Lebanon and His Escape

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