Lebanese Actors Want Filming to Resume Before Ramadan

Lebanese actors want to resume filming before ramadan
Instagram / Maguy Bou Ghosn

Since the government-imposed general mobilization began last month, Lebanese filmmakers and actors have been forced to stop working on their projects. But with Ramadan on the horizon, actors are raising their voices to go back to work.

“We are not in Hollywood and do not own millions, we are seasonal workers, and there are per diem technicians who do not get paid without working,” actress Carmen Lebbos tweeted on Thursday.

Under the hashtag “لازم_نكمل_تصوير” (We must resume filming), Lebanese actors united to ask the government, specifically Minister of Interior Mohammad Fehmi, to allow them to finish their suspended works.

Many Lebanese actors, including Maguy Bou Ghosn, Cyrine Abdelnour, Bassem Moughnieh, and others, have participated in the social media campaign.

The actors find it harmless to be shooting under the supervision of specialized medical teams, using proper preventive measures, which is what the filmmakers of some neighboring countries have been doing during the COVID-19 situation.

There are currently many frozen TV shows that are due to release in Ramadan, including “Al-Hayba 4” and “20 20.”

As reported by Al-Akhbar, Lebanese film production companies have not yet canceled their projects. However, with only 2 weeks left before the holy month arrives, the local entertainment industry finds itself under immense pressure.

This is because, as is commonly known, Ramadan is considered “the season” of TV shows for Lebanon.

While many projects will most likely not meet their deadlines as a result of weeks of stagnation, resuming work will, nonetheless, cut losses for film production crews, including the protesting actors.

At the time of writing, the efforts of the social media campaign have not paid off. On Thursday, the Lebanese government extended the general mobilization for the second time.

In the end, it is up to the Interior Ministry to decide whether to exempt the entertainment industry from the “essential businesses only” rule during the ongoing pandemic.