Beirut Blast Claims Another Victim 7 Months Later

Nabil Ismail | Sanahine Kassabian

Time has passed and seasons have changed since the heart-shattering Beirut Port Explosion. Yet even after 7 months, the tragedy has claimed yet another victim.

The harrowing story of 57-year-old Ardem was told by his cousin, Sanahine Kassabian. Like many Beirut residents, Ardem’s house had suffered considerable damages in the devastating event.

Additionally, he also lost the pet shop he owned, which was located in Gemmayzé just meters away from the port. This left him “mentally and emotionally broken. He couldn’t eat, couldn’t sleep, couldn’t talk,” explained Kassabian.

“A few weeks ago, he was unable to stand up and walk. He observed his own body melting,” she said. When he was transferred to the hospital, it was too late. He couldn’t be saved.

This made him the latest of over 200 victims who died during the blast or after succumbing to injuries sustained in the blast.

However, Kassabian wanted to point out that Ardem’s wounds were not physical. They were not life-threatening in the traditional sense. His wounds were embedded deeply in his heart and soul. And they were eating at him from the inside out.

“Ardem’s case is an example of the long-term consequences of the Beirut blast on the Lebanese people,” she lamented.

By sharing her cousin’s story, Kassabian wanted to shed light on the dangers of the mental and emotional trauma caused by the blast.

“Thousands of people are still suffering from the consequences of this traumatic experience. Mental and emotional trauma can kill people as well,” she cautioned and urged people not to stop talking about Beirut.

“Our battle for life hasn’t stopped. Rest in peace, dear Ardem. You’re in a better place now.”

If you or anyone you know are struggling with mental health, please do not hesitate to reach out for help.


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