UK Scientists Will Start Testing Coronavirus Vaccine on Humans by Summer

Dr. Robin Shattock | Imperial College

According to The Independent, scientists of the Imperial College in London are optimistic about starting their clinical trials of the Coronavirus vaccine on humans in a few months, that is if sufficient funding would be provided to them.

The scientists have already received promising results of the vaccine on mice.

Lebanese-Italian doctor Hussein Jalloul mentioned this vaccine in his video addressing the Lebanon people.

However, he predicted that it would take about six months for it to be ready for humans, but it looks like the testing will start sooner than that.

The Head of Mucosal Infection and Immunity in the Department of Infectious Disease at the Imperial College, Dr. Robin Shattock, said that the university now possesses a prototype vaccine in animal models and that the primary results are encouraging.

These scientists are confident about making progress in the clinical trials by summer and are hoping to obtain sufficient funding to do so. Noting that they did apply to the Medical Research Council for additional funding.

The team tested their vaccine on monkeys with other researchers in Paris. However, the conclusive test will be seeing the results on humans.

These scientists are aware of the fact that other researchers around the world are working to develop a vaccine for COVID-19.

Coronavirus Vaccine – Reuters

But as Dr. Shattock put it: “This is a global effort. We are not racing against each other, but we are racing against the virus.”

A company among the US vaccine-making institutions also hopes to start separate clinical trials in spring 2020, after receiving a large boost in funding.

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