National Geographic DNA Analysis Suggests That Lebanese Are Only 44% Arabian

The National Geographic have analysed the DNA of over 60 geographic and ethnic populations to determine the regional affiliations. The National Geographic DNA analysis found that modern-day indigenous populations around the world carry particular blends of 18 regional affiliations.

 

The National Geographic DNA analysis found that modern-day indigenous populations around the world carry particular blends of 18 regional affiliations. In the study, they examined the DNA of Lebanese people from a pool of a few hundred.

The results of the analysis suggest that Lebanese people are 44% Arabian, 14% Jewish Diaspora, 2% Eastern Africa, 11% Northern Africa, 10% Asia Minor and 5% Southern Europe. You should note that this is in reference to the modern regional affiliations and not our ancient affiliation or ancestry. So there won’t be “Phoenician” affiliation.

 

Which also were a very diverse people, just like the modern day Lebanese population. As Roudy Tac explains:

“Interpreting 44% Arabia that we are Arabs is wrong. They used J2 and J1 to as part of Arabia (which is correct) but was carried by different people in the region (Phoenician, Assyrian, Greek etc)”

The National Geographic explains these results as such:

“This reference population is based on the native population of Lebanon. As some ancient populations migrated from Africa, they passed first through the Middle East en route to Eurasia. Some populations stayed in the Middle East and over time developed unique genetic patterns. The mixture of Arabian, Northern Africa, and Asia Minor is unique to this part of the world. The Arabian and Northern Africa components reflect ancient patterns of settlement and interaction in the region, while the Silk Road may have served to add genetic patterns from farther north and east.”

 

It’s quite fascinating but not so much surprising to see how we have traces of African and Asian in our DNA. Lebanon was and continues to be the center point of the world. My only criticism is the size of the pool. Are a few hundred people enough to determine the regional affiliation of such a diverse population? Was the study only limited to Lebanese in Lebanon or including the diaspora? Since there are significant differences in the demographics.

 

Source

Log In

Or with username:

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.